Skip to content ↓
''

Citizenship

Citizenship: Aims / Philosophy

Citizenship education provides an opportunity for students at The Pavilion to develop the knowledge, skills and understanding they will require in order to play an important part in society as active and responsible people. At Key Stage 4 Citizenship provides a platform where can deepen their knowledge about rights and responsibilities, politics, parliament and voting as well as issues around human rights, the criminal justice system, law and the economy. In order to better grasp these concepts they also learn the skills of active citizenship such as advocacy and representation which bring learning to life and enable students to participate in real issues in both local and global contexts. These skills will enable students at The Pavilion to use a range of research strategies, weigh up evidence, make persuasive arguments and substantiate their conclusions.

Teaching should build on the key stage 3 programme of study to deepen pupils’ understanding of democracy, government and the rights and responsibilities of citizens. Pupils should develop their skills to be able to use a range of research strategies, weigh up evidence, make persuasive arguments and substantiate their conclusions. They should experience and evaluate different ways that citizens can act together to solve problems and contribute to society.

Pupils should be taught about:

  • parliamentary democracy and the key elements of the constitution of the United Kingdom, including the power of government, the role of citizens and Parliament in holding those in power to account, and the different roles of the executive, legislature and judiciary and a free press
  • the different electoral systems used in and beyond the United Kingdom and actions citizens can take in democratic and electoral processes to influence decisions locally, nationally and beyond
  • other systems and forms of government, both democratic and non-democratic, beyond the United Kingdom
  • local, regional and international governance and the United Kingdom’s relations with the rest of Europe, the Commonwealth, the United Nations and the wider world
  • human rights and international law
  • the legal system in the UK, different sources of law and how the law helps society deal with complex problems
  • diverse national, regional, religious and ethnic identities in the United Kingdom and the need for mutual respect and understanding
  • the different ways in which a citizen can contribute to the improvement of their community, to include the opportunity to participate actively in community volunteering, as well as other forms of responsible activity
  • income and expenditure, credit and debt, insurance, savings and pensions, financial products and services, and how public money is raised and spent

In England, citizenship is a statutory National Curriculum foundation subject in secondary schools. The citizenship programmes of study set out what schools must address in their citizenship teaching.

  • 58b Chandos Avenue
    Whetstone
    N20 9DX

    0208 446 1533

  • Pavilion
    110 Meadway
    Barnet
    EN5 5JX

    0208 359 5240

  • The Pavilion - Church Farm
    Church Hill Rd,
    East Barnet,
    London EN4 8XE

    0203 890 8474

  • Galaxy Ward,
    Barnet General Hospital,
    Wellhouse Lane, Barnet,
    EN5 3DJ

    0208 216 5208